RENEWABLE ENERGY – SOLAR

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Green Energy – Introduction

We have been going through Global warming and local weather change points attributable to air pollution of fossil fuels.  We definitely have to focus over Green Energy – New Type of Energy.  Folks everywhere in the earth planet have grown drained of having to linger across the air pollution that has been with us for many years. As everyone knows there are Green Energy – New Type of Energy applied sciences which have been found only in the near past. Are these items for actual? Yes, these applied sciences exist and actually are very actual. If you have seen the destruction over the previous few years brought on by a number of environmental components, you may simply see that altering our methods a bit of bit can be an excellent assist.

Different Sorts Of Energy

There are differing types of energy now we have at hand proper now. But of all the kinds and classifications, these energy sources are damaged in two normal sorts, the inexperienced supply and fossil fuels. That latter is a seen in most locations. If you are questioning the place you will discover the purposes of fossil fuels, look no additional. The commonest place to search out fossil fuels is by merely our streets. Cars have essentially the most consumption for these fuels. The not so good facet of having this sort of energy is the emissions. And when you’ve got 1,000,000 vehicles strolling round for a day consuming a minimal of a minimum of 2 liters of gasoline, we suppose you are able to do the mathematics.

The significantly better kind of energy know-how is the clear kind. This kind can also be known as Clean, Green Energy – New Type of Energy as there aren’t any emissions produced. This in flip will get rid of the air pollution. It makes use of the current assets from nature in numerous types. The commonest of which is solar and wind energy. The thought in that is to harness the already present energy of our environment. Remember that even when we don’t use this types of energy nonetheless they’re current every day. Then that is fairly sensible to make use of to substitute fossil fuels. All now we have to do is to harness this energy into other types like electricity. This is a extra versatile type.

Solar Energy in India

India is endowed with vast solar energy potential. About 5,000 trillion kWh per year energy is incident over India’s land area with most parts receiving 4-7 kWh per sq. m per day. Hence both technology routes for conversion of solar radiation into heat and electricity, namely, solar thermal and solar photovoltaics, can effectively be harnessed providing huge scalability for solar in India. Solar also provides the ability to generate power on a distributed basis and enables rapid capacity addition with short lead times. Off-grid decentralized and low-temperature applications will be advantageous from a rural electrification perspective and meeting other energy needs for power and heating and cooling in both rural and urban areas. From an energy security perspective, solar is the most secure of all sources, since it is abundantly available. Theoretically, a small fraction of the total incident solar energy (if captured effectively) can meet the entire country’s power requirements. It is also clear that given the large proportion of poor and energy un-served population in the country, every effort needs to be made to exploit the relatively abundant sources of energy available to the country. While, today, domestic coal based power generation is the cheapest electricity source, future scenarios suggest that this could well change.

Source: www.mnre.gov.in

Solar power in India is a fast developing industry. The country’s solar installed capacity reached 20 GW in February 2018.India expanded its solar-generation capacity 8 times from 2,650 MW on 26 May 2014 to over 20 GW as on 31 January 2018. The 20 GW capacity was initially targeted for 2022 but the government achieved the target four years ahead of schedule. The country added 3 GW of solar capacity in 2015-2016, 5 GW in 2016-2017 and over 10 GW in 2017-2018, with the average current price of solar electricity dropping to 18% below the average price of its coal-fired counterpart.

In January 2015 the Indian government expanded its solar plans, targeting US$100 billion in investment and 100 GW of solar capacity (including 40 GW from rooftop solar) by 2022. India’s initiative of 100 GW of solar energy by 2022 is an ambitious target, since the world’s installed solar-power capacity in 2017 is expected to be 303 GW. The improvements in solar thermal storage power technology in recent years has made this task achievable as the cheaper solar power need not depend on costly and polluting coal/gas/nuclear based power generation for ensuring stable grid operation.

In addition to its large-scale grid-connected solar PV initiative, India is developing off-grid solar power for local energy needs. Solar products have increasingly helped to meet rural needs; by the end of 2015 just under one million solar lanterns were sold in the country, reducing the need for kerosene. That year, 118,700 solar home lighting systems were installed and 46,655 solar street lighting installations were provided under a national program, just over 1.4 million solar cookers were distributed in India.

A report published by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) found that India installed 10 GW of solar in 2017, almost double its record in 2016. Crucially, India’s “Scheme for Development of Solar Parks” has proven successful at attracting foreign capital toward construction of the world’s largest ultra-mega solar parks.

With about 300 clear and sunny days in a year, the calculated solar energy incidence on India’s land area is about 5000 trillion kilowatt-hours (kWh) per year (or 5 EWh/yr).[21][22] The solar energy available in a single year exceeds the possible energy output of all of the fossil fuel energy reserves in India. The daily average solar-power-plant generation capacity in India is 0.20 kWh per m2 of used land area, equivalent to 1400–1800 peak (rated) capacity operating hours in a year with available, commercially-proven technology.

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